So, I Got Married Two Months Ago…

When I was engaged the one piece of advice that everyone wanted to give me was “everything that can go wrong, will go wrong.” Not that I fault these people for trying to keep me from having unrealistic expectations for my wedding, but my husband I got married a little over two months ago and I can’t think of a single thing that  went wrong. It was beyond perfect!

As you can see from the pictures, the colors were yellow and gray with a vintage-literary vibe. Literary in the sense that my flower girl scattered paper heart cut outs from old books, and my program was titled A Tale of Two Hearts, but all joking aside it was amazing. The  ceremony was flawless. I had an excerpt read from a children’s book titled “I Like You” by Sandol Stoddard Warburg had everyone laughing and Frank Sinatra’s “That’s All” was sung  while we lit the unity candle (my hand was shaking so bad I couldn’t light the candle and everyone in the front row was laughing at me.) After the ceremony, we took pictures by a local lake with the bridal party. It was ridiculously  hot, which was hardly a surprise for Southern California in late summer, but after an hour of posing for pictures my husband and I were parched. We stopped by a gas station to pick up some Big Gulps in our wedding attire (lucky for us  they were on the house. Yay!) Unfortunately, when we did arrive at the reception I forgot to take our gas station cokes out of the pictures, and  look a little out of place.  After what seemed like a million family pictures and a battle of the wedding toasts we drove off to our honeymoon.

My day was perfect.  I wish I could take the credit for it and say that it was because of my impeccable planning and attention to detail. Anyone who really knows how frantic I am, knows how far from the truth that is. My day was flawless because I had God and  people who helped me look over all the small details.  My photographers were also the best! If you don’t know where to start with wedding planning, I implore you to get good quality photographers so you can remember your day. I’m glad I did.

Stephanie & Jesse Wedding [Captured by Studio Cline] Decor 018 Stephanie & Jesse Wedding [Captured by Studio Cline] Procession 065

Stephanie & Jesse Wedding [Captured by Studio Cline] Ceremony 039 Stephanie & Jesse Wedding [Captured by Studio Cline] Ceremony 077

jStephanie & Jesse Wedding [Captured by Studio Cline] Decor 056 Stephanie & Jesse Wedding [Captured by Studio Cline] Decor 079 Stephanie & Jesse Wedding [Captured by Studio Cline] Lake Portrait 042 Stephanie & Jesse Wedding [Captured by Studio Cline] Lake Portrait 045Stephanie & Jesse Wedding [Captured by Studio Cline] Toasts 093 Stephanie & Jesse Wedding [Captured by Studio Cline] Lake Portrait 116 Stephanie & Jesse Wedding [Captured by Studio Cline] Procession 013 Stephanie & Jesse Wedding [Captured by Studio Cline] Rings & Flowers 004

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From California Girl to Pittsburgher

The best thing about moving is starting over.  I loved the “clean slate” feeling.  I loved the fact that nobody knew me.  Nobody asked me what I was planning to do with my education degree.  I don’t find myself explaining that between the limits of my degree and utter lack of desire to explain punctuation to ungrateful high-schoolers, teaching is no where in my near future. (Looks like I got that off my chest! haha)

On the other hand, there’s the part of moving where I have to figure out where everything is.  Luckily, I had my husband to show me around, but Pittsburgh was quite a move.  I realized that I had to not only get used to a new city, but a new culture.

pittsburgh

  • Sports culture.  For the small time that I cleaned houses, I came to the conclusion that everyone has framed picture of some Pittsburgh stadium in their home. I’ve never lived somewhere with such loyalty to local teams. Californians don’t like one specific team when it comes to anything. Not everyone in San Diego was a Chargers fan, not all people in LA like the Dodgers etc.
  • Driving. I live off William Flynn Hwy, that ‘s what all the signs say anyway. Nobody calls it William Flynn Hwy.  They call it Route 8. I have yet to see any signs that say Route 8. Whatever.  Not to mention the lack of left turn lanes. As a newbie driver, there is nothing more terrifying than stopping my car with my left turn signal on  as cars maneuver their way around me at  forty miles per hour while I wait for a break in traffic big enough to make my turn. Not to mention the fact that now I have to worry about deer jumping in front of my car when I drive home from work, that’s definitely a first.
  • City pronunciation. Not too far from where I live are the cities of Carnegie and Versailles. Carnegie is not pronounced like Andrew Carnegie, or like a Carnegie Library, it is instead pronounced car-NEG-ee.  One would also assume that Versailles is pronounced just like the palace in France. False. It’s said ver-SAILS.
  • Talking the Talk. I really don’t know everything about the “Pittsburgh accent”, but there are some things I have noticed:

– the long O’s. “So, I went hoooome at four-thirty.”

– It’s not “you guys” or “y’all” it’s “yins”. For real.

– The sentences that sound like questions. Some people have this upward inflection at the end of their sentences. It makes “You went to the gym already” sound like “You went to the gym already?”

And, I love it here! It is beautiful. Every route is a scenic route. The people are really nice (When I’m not wearing my Dodger shirt anyway.) Pittsburgh is a great city; I’m excited to make a life here.

What are some new things you had to get used to after moving?

Word count: 340 Draft saved at 9:38:41 pm. Last edited by honestlymodest on September 24, 2013 at 7:00 pm

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Four Annoying Girls & How to Deal With Them

  1. The “Giggly” Girls: I think Audrey Hepburn said it best in Sabrina when she is hiding in a tree watching her crush flirt with one of these ditzy types. “I hate girls who giggle all the time” Me too, Audrey. Me too.
    1. How to Spot One:
      1. They are overly optimistic, and are most likely smiling.
      2. They or their friends probably work for the Dean of Women’s office.
      3. Usually morning people. Freshman usually sing in the morning, most likely a Disney song.
    2. How to Deal:
      1. DON’T: Use sarcasm. Most of the time it will just go over their heads. Stay away from comments that you’re going to have to spend more time explaining than delivering.
      2. DO: Use basic words and open your eyes unnaturally wide, while adding an occasional smile or head nod. Mirroring body language makes for more effective communication.English: Studio publicity portrait for film Sa...
  2. Me-Monsters/ One-Uppers: Comedian, Brian Regan aptly labeled this type the “me-monsters”, and I couldn’t think of a more appropriate moniker for this self-absorbed sort. Everybody has a Me-Monster in their life. You can spot them as soon as you start a conversation. Their injury is just a little more severe than the one you experienced, their student-teaching is a little harder than what you have to teach, their day has been just a little more eventful than your day.
    1. How to Spot One:
      1. For every story you share, they have a more severe, more extreme experience that will always top your story.
      2. They only use first-person pronouns.
    2. How to Deal:
      1. DO: Make the whole conversation about them to begin with. Don’t try to share any personal information unless you want it belittled and pushed to the side by some bigger and better experience.
      2. DON’T: Try to “One-Up” their story. They will think of some relative or close friend that has a crazier experience. This will go on until you let them win.
      3. DO: Just walk away. Watch Kristen Wiig’s “Penelope” skits on SNL. You’ll laugh at this exaggerated portrayal of Me-Monsters and be reminded that nobody likes them.
  3. The “Selfie”-Obsessed: Pretty people who feel the need to remind you how good-looking they are by posting at least one picture of themselves a week.
      1. How to Spot One:
        1. On Facebook:
          1. They change their profile picture at least once a week.
          2. They might down play some compliment in the comments section.
            1. “You look gorgeous!”
            2. Reply: “Oh my goodness! I look so gross in this pic!”
        2. On Instagram:
          1. They always take a self-portrait to document menial events in their lives.
            1. “I really need coffee (duck face)”
            2. Inspirational quote + self-portrait
          2. Most of their feed is face shots.
          3. Most of their pictures receive a considerable amount of likes.
      2. How to Deal:
        1. DON’T: Like these pictures. As you can imagine, this only encourages more “Selfie” behavior and posts in the future.
        2. DO: remove these people from your feed if they annoy you. You can keep them on your feed for a good laugh.
  4. The Strained Personality: People who try to be funny/smart/cocky but just aren’t.
    1. How to Spot One:
      1. Most likely this person will try to use unnecessary hashtags on Facebook in an attempt to be witty.
      2. They misuse hashtags by applying spaces between words or apostrophes.
        1. #I’mSuchANerd
        2. #Smart Girl Problems
      3. They misuse Meme Humor in an attempt to be culturally relevant.
        1. The Most Interesting Man in the World
        2. Conspiracy Keanu
        3. Bad Luck Brian
      1. How to Deal:
        1. DON’T: encourage this behavior by liking these posts.
        2. DON’T: Remind them that hashtags are irrelevant on Facebook. You won’t be the first or the last to point this out.
        3. DO: Sometimes the “Do not show in News Feed” is the answer to everything.

Confessions of a Literary Hipster

“I read that book way before it was a movie.” It’s a phrase I find myself saying more and more often; what with the imminent release of Anna Karenina and The Great Gatsby and such of the like. There is a certain frustration that some people will never understand.

1. The “Elitist” mentality

As a sophomore in high school I picked up Anna Karenina, the classic 600-paged tragic Russian novel. Needless to say by the end of it I felt extremely accomplished. As if I earned the right to know the plot of the story.  It’s not a feat accomplished by many.  This “elitist mentality” as my boyfriend calls it, reared it’s head when I was watching Nicholas Sparks’ The Last Song. I was quite unhappy to

Cover of "Anna Karenina (Oxford World's C...

Cover of Anna Karenina (Oxford World’s Classics)

discover that Miley Cyrus was cast as the main character. Cyrus did not fit Ronnie’s physique and personality in the slightest. Personally, I thought this was displayed best when Cyrus casually picks up Tolstoy’s classic and begins to read it on the beach. “In what world would that happen?” I thought to myself, “this girl tweets about her excrement for crying out loud!” Thus, the “elitist” mentality came out – I didn’t think Cyrus was good/smart/worthy enough to read the book like I did.

2. The Ruined Mental Imagery

This is probably the thing that bothers me the least, but as I read I know I have my set mental imagery. I, as well as pretty much all readers, have opinions about how everything and everyone should look and act. A movie is someone else’s interpretation. I don’t always agree with their interpretation.

Whenever I read a story and one of the female characters is described as a plain or just ugly woman, I always wonder about the actresses that get cast in these roles. Did they read the character description in the novel? Random thought, sorry.

3. The Sin of Hollywood Omission

Probably one of the scariest things about having a beloved book be brought to the silver screen is what could be left out of it. “What did they see as ‘unnecessary’?” In most cases, the scenes that are left out for the film’s sake are very small in the grand scheme of the entire plot. The only time I can remember being truly angry about that was when Jodi Picoult’s My Sister’s Keeper came out as a movie. They changed the ending completely; I mean to the point where they killed off a completely different character at the end. That is just wrong.

With that said, I still don’t know if anyone really understands where I’m coming from. Looking over this I sound like a total snob, and trust me, that’s really not the case. There’s just something about reading a book, and then seeing it become a movie that some people will never understand.